VCPL Community Archives--Jackson/Ray Letters--Transcripts

Jackson-Ray Letters

Transcript:

Letter from Harvey Jackson
to Americus Miller Ray

December 16, 1862

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                Terre Haute. Dec 16. 1862

Brother Miller.
                              We read your letter dated
the fourth  we were glad to learn that
you was getting better.  I am in hopse
you will take good care of yourself
when you get sick, especially if you get
the measles if a person  takes cold with them
they hardly ever get overit.  it is very cold
today after the rain  it raind here last
Saturday & sunday & then a sunday knight
we had a tremendious rain the cricks was
as high as I ever saw them.  we had a very
fine fall the roads were dusty last friday.
We are enjoying pretty good health John & Ida
are in bed asleep  Anna is sewing up the
old carpet we have to do a good many ways these
war times.  but I expect we see good time to
what you & thousand of other soldiers do.  so we have
no reason to complain. our Elder preaches for us
at Mt pleasant next thursday knight I heard
him preach aboute twenty years ago when he
was just starting oute to preach he is the
[Nobles?] that use to teach school up by the old
Doctors.  I suppose you know [ink blot] who the old doctor is
he is the man that has a gall that is in her
sweet sixteen I saw her the other day & she looked fine

 

 

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Miller we havent seen any of our folks
since last sunday week they were all well
at that time. I believe [Sip?] is going to school
to Mollie Dodd.  you spoke of turkeys & chickens
coming in camp & I suppose after they come in
to camp you dont let them get oute with ther
feathers on them.  I think if I was in the
service I would save all I could get holdof.
I havent much news to wright I believe
aboute the war report is that the two
greate armies are fighting both sides hold
their their grounds that they commenced on
I am in hopse by spring the war will be over
so you with a great many others can return
to your homes. Eli Hunts remains were brought
home last week & was burried last Sunday
he was in the thirty first & in Mewhinney
Co.  I believe I will close as Ann wants to write
some & I havent any thing of importence to wright
    your [Obt.?]      H. Jackson

 

 

  *Note to researcher:  This letter has been transcribed by Archives staff verbatim
as the words appear on the original written page.  The spacing, punctuation, and
capitalization are identical.  Words that are unclear have been enclosed in brackets.
 

 

Transcript:

Letter from Demerris Anna Ray Jackson
to Americus Miller Ray


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                       Dearest and ever loved brother.
                                                                  I am glad of another
opportunity of writing to you, but we are much more rejoiced
to hear that you was getting well, when we hear once.  we
wait with great anxiety for the next to come, as health is
very uncertain in the Army, and it is the almost the same
everywhere. there has been a good deal of sickness through
the country.  We have no promise of health nor our lives, not
even for a day longer, others are dropping around us one by one
this tells that all things earthly must soon pass away.  I suppose
you have heard of  Mrs Doby's death and also Wesly Jackson
the time has again come when men must assist, the wid-
ows they have to make wood chopping & corn huskings, and
sometime get-their own wood.  Times are very hard every
thing is very high, and money scarce. this scarcity you know
something about too, I don't suppose you see much money
there. but that you can do without . if you could always get
enough to eat. it seems hard that soldiers must deprive
themselves of every comfort, and sometimes not as much as
they want to eat.  We that are at home, often think you
when we com to the table, and would gladly carry you a
part, if we could only do so. You are never forgotten by us. al=
though you are far away. this thought brings nought but sorrow
and silent tear steal down the cheek.  War is a terrible thing
it makes things desolate wherever it is. not only does desolation
follow armies but it comes the homes of the many brave
soldiers who have taken their leave of home and friends
 

 

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      We do not see our folks at home very often. as Cris is
away all week and the rest are all kept busy  father is not
very hearty, it is quite cold and muddy, and you know this
keeps people at home too.  Christmas will soon be here, but
I believe there is nothing going on more than ususal, there
will be meeting at our church at that time.  I wish you
could be at home with us, to spend Christmas, that, would be
better than all else the world could give.  We read of a place,
where parting never comes.  I think that must be a happy place
where sorrow and anguish can not be, I don't know as we
should complain but all seems to be gloomy.   News are a
little discouraging [indecipherable] that Burnsides has gone back across
the Rappahanock som say driven [by?] the enemy.  there is
great anxiety among the people.  the great battle has commenced
which has so long been expected.   if we are defeated this
time it will be a great loss.    The 71st are here yet I be-
lieve, they have been looking for orders go, there has been
some sickness among them they have had the measles too
I expect you will have a chance for that disease.  It is nearly
eleven. and I have nothing now to tell you, so I will write
no more this time.  write soon.  we always think the time
long to hear from you, no more this time but remain
                                      Your sister.  D. A. Jackson 

P.S. You will please [ink blot] excuse so many mistakes. I always
write at night when the children are asleep, and a poor light
                                                                       in the bargain to [?]        

 

 

  *Note to researcher:  This letter has been transcribed by Archives staff verbatim
as the words appear on the original written page.  The spacing, punctuation, and
capitalization are identical.  Words that are unclear have been enclosed in brackets.